• Immigration and Asylum Law

    Our immigration law team has an excellent reputation for its expertise and efficiency in getting the kind of result that every client would expect, upon instructing a top firm.

    We specialise in all immigration and asylum applications including but not limited to settling in the UK – naturalisation and citizenship, indefinite leave to remain, EEA registration certificates, partner visas, dependant visas, family permits, residence cards, permanent residence, visitors applications, all applications under Appendix FM of the Immigration Rules.

    Our solicitors also specialise in advising on applications under the Point Based System (Tier 1, 2, 4 and 5 visas)

    Our team have the expertise needed to assist with asylum and human right applications, and unaccompanied minors, judicial reviews and reuniting refugees with their families, as well as provide representation for clients before the Immigration Tribunal, Court of Appeal and the European Court of Justice. Furthermore, we also provide assistance for clients with bail applications and unlawful detention.

    We hold a civil contract with the Legal Aid Agency to provide publicly funded advice and assistance where a matter is deemed to have sufficient merits and satisfies the means test criteria under LASPO 2012. Where any prospective client does not meet the public funding criteria we are able to assist privately in all areas of Immigration law.

    Appeals at the Tribunal

    The tribunal is an independent legal body which makes decisions on appeals. The tribunal consists of independently appointed expert tax Judges and/or panel Members.

    The tribunal often makes its decisions at or after a hearing, where both sides put their case to the tribunal in person. But in a variety of straightforward cases the tribunal will make its decision based on the written information that both sides have sent in.

    Business Migrations

    Many employers rely on being able to hire people from outside the UK or Europe to ensure their workforce has the best skills, experience and qualifications. Recruitment from overseas is often essential for positions where there is a skills shortage in the UK or where specialist language skills are needed. Individuals are often keen to come to the UK to work, set up a business or study.

    However, if your main aim is to ensure that your new employees are able to start work quickly and move to the UK with as little stress as possible, UK immigration law and procedures can often seem unduly complex and complicated.

    Leave to Enter  / Leave to Remain

    Applicants who have completed a two years probationary period in the UK may be eligible to apply for indefinite leave to remain also known as settlement or permanent residence. However, in certain circumstances, applicants may be able to apply for indefinite leave to enter the UK i.e. from the British entry clearance post abroad.

    Applicants who have completed a two years probationary period in the UK may be eligible to apply for indefinite leave to remain also known as settlement or permanent residence. However, in certain circumstances, applicants may be able to apply for indefinite leave to enter the UK i.e. from the British entry clearance post abroad.

    In most cases, applicants will need to apply for entry clearance to enter the UK to join their spouse. However, where applicants have been married and living abroad together for at least 4 years or more, they may apply for settlement straight away.

    The requirements are that:

    • The applicant is married or has registered a civil partnership which has been subsisting for at least four years
    • They have been residing together outside the UK in this marriage/civil partnership
    • They intend to return to the UK to live together permanently
    • The non settled spouse must pass the Life in the UK test

     

    EEA Application

    Deportations

    A person who has been served with a notice of intention to deport can appeal against such notice within 5 working days from the date of receipt of such notice. The notice of appeal must be filed with the First Tier Tribunal where the Immigration Judge will hear the appeal and decide whether or not the deportation is in accordance with the law.

    According to the Immigration Rules, a deportation order will not be made if the person’s removal pursuant to the order would be contrary to the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention or the Human Rights Convention. Where deportation would not be contrary to these obligations, it will only be in exceptional circumstances that the public interest in deportation is outweighed.